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Spain & Wine

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One of the greatest pleasures of visiting a different country is the chance to sample some of the country’s traditional wines; Spain is no exception. Over fifty percent of the European Union’s vineyards lie in Spain and vino (tinto, blanco or rosado) in served to accompany every meal.

At lunchtime, a glass or a small pitcher of the house wine (often served straight from the barrel) is usually included the menú del día; otherwise the wine starts at €5–10 a bottle, although this can rise swiftly in price for the extra special stuff.

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Over the last decade Spanish wine has enjoyed an amazing renaissance, led largely by the international success of famous wine – producing regions such as La Rioja and Ribera del Duero. Other regions that are not quite as well-known abroad is Galicia or the Priorat in Catalunya, and they are worth a visit as they are set up and usually have bodega (winery) visit, tastings and tours. In Andalucía, the classic wine is sherry – vino de jerez – while champagne in Spain means the Catalan sparkling wine, cava.

The drink that majority of tourists drink and think is the most famous in Spain is Sangría. This is a wine-and-fruit punch that is often deceptively strong; a variation in Catalunya is sangría de cava. There are a couple of variations on this, such as: Tinto de Verano (red-wine-and-soda or lemonade combination), Tinto de Verano con Naranja (red wine with orangeade) or Con Limón (lemonade).

Sangria

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