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Fallas of Valencia, a festival of pyrotechnic shows that will blow your mind

Colors and sounds blend into design and rhythm to come together in one enormous mascletá or pyrotechnic event that takes place in one of Spain’s most important national festivals which is known as “Las Fallas” and was originally only celebrated in Valencia, but due to its profound root in the Spanish culture and its enormous national and international appeal, it is currently staged in many other communities across the country.

This Wednesday a “mascletá” or massive display of fireworks was simply fabulously achieved for a 26th year in a row by a local fireworks producer.

A newspaper from Valencia described the display by Piroctecnia Zarzoso, as “a roaring start to the greatest days of the Fallas which run March 15-19, when the festival carries out the closing ceremony with a “golden stroke.”

But the vibrant festival also includes many other events, such as bullfights, traditional dances and just plain fun meeting people from around the world who travel from afar to be at this famous festival.

“The main event of today has resulted as we expected, very good. The day has also been blessed with great weather and the people have been great as always”, said Antonio Zarzoso, one of the owners of Pirotecnia Zarzoso who have been in charge of the so call Josephine Fiestas since 1991.

The Zarzoso Family, run by Antonio and his sisters Jesica and Chelo, doesn’t just make fireworks, it produces incredible shows that bring together lights and rhythms.

Whilst thousands of festivals are celebrated all year around in Spain, there are very few that actually draw international attention like the Falla, which dates back to an undetermined moment of the Middle Ages.

A website called Spanish Fiestas explains that at the centre of the celebration is Saint Joseph, the patron of carpenters.

Many centuries ago – somewhere between the 5th and the 15th – carpenters hung up planks of wood called “parots”’ in the winter to hold their candles for lighting when working.

When spring was announcing its arrival, they would burn the candleholders as a way to celebrate the end having to work in the dark and in very cold weather.

The huge candleholders or parots were dressed years after and made to look like a well-known personality from the local community. This figures became the “ninots” or enormous figures of today, which usually end up being satirical displays of local and international politicians.

All Photos: Turismo de Valencia

As the years, decades and centuries have gone by, the tradition has grown to the point that committees are formed in each neighbourhood to carefully plan the festivities.

The Fallas celebrations start early each day with a startling wake-up call at 8:00 a.m. Brass bands come marching down the streets along with massively loud firecrackers capable of setting off car and shop alarms.

Each night there is an extraordinary firework display in the old river bed, explains Fiestas de España, and they increase in showmanship until the final night of 19 March known as the “La Nit de Foc” or “The Night of Fire” followed by all-night celebrations and parties.

There is no good way to describe the festival so our suggestion to you is, visit. Below are some links to more information regarding the festivities in Valencia.

Consult in Spanish all the information regarding Fallas de Valencia, including the programme for the Fallas 2017, about the Offerings, as well as the el calendar for mascletaes y castles. Don’t miss the Fallas 2017 Prizes, and the  dates and times of the Feria de Fallas 2017 and for all the live concerts at Vvieros.  You can also take a glance at “verbenas y and mobile discos. If you drive, there is parking information here.

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