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Some of the Best Preserved Medieval Towns in Spain

Often when you think about old Europe and its small towns, you imagine them all built-in stone, with old churches and homes, maybe an ancient stone bridge… Well, Spain has got all that. Walking through these villages is like immersing yourself in a fairy tale, and their narrow streets, walls and castles transport you to a magnificent time of legend.

 

A country of castles and walls, Spain has been carefully preserving its medieval era, and this atmosphere is impressive especially in small towns, where the streets are still keeping their personality, and no new buildings and modern materials interfere with the original architecture. If you want to make a trip to the Middle Ages you can start with:

 

Ainsa, Huesca: The castle preserves almost intact its walls and the Tower of Homaje. Also its Plaza Mayor with Romanesque porches and semicircular arches is a true gem.

 

 

Albarracín, Teruel: From a distance, the panorama surprises us with a wall that not only encloses the historic center but also leaves it to rise on a hill.

 

 

Besalú, Girona: One of the best preserved in all Catalonia, Besalú is only half an hour away from Girona. The main attraction is its Romanesque bridge, which receives visitors as an authentic medieval door, as well as probably the best-preserved remains of a mikve (a communal bath) from the Medieval times.

 

 

Buitrago de Lozoya, Madrid: In the Sierra de Guadarrama, this town is elevated on a promontory and surrounded by a river. The highlight is its defensive campus.

 

 

Calatañazor, Soria: Is a place where it seems that time has stopped – a treasure on the top of a rock surrounded by almost intact walls, with stoned streets, houses of stone, adobe and wood, and a half-ruined castle.

 

 

Hervás, Cáceres: It is a pleasure to walk through its old town, full of narrow and steep streets, with houses of wooden roofs and balconies flown.

 

 

Peñafiel, Valladolid: Highlights include its impressive castle and Plaza del Coso, where bullfighting celebrations are still held today.

 

 

Peratallada, Girona: Besides the Castillo-Fortaleza, or fortified castle, its cobbled streets and houses, full of flowers and plants, its arches and small squares are a beauty.

 

Ronda, Málaga: Its impressive bridge joins the two sides of its old quarter separated by more than 150 meters of the gorge.

 

 

Sepúlveda, Segovia: Known as the Village of the Seven Gates, this fortified city preserves important and marvelous remains of its medieval past.

 

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